Notogomphus cottarellii Consiglio, 1978
Cottarelli's Longleg

Type locality: Kaffa Province, Ethiopia

Diagnosis

Male is similar to N. ruppeli by (a) being restricted to Ethiopia; (b) antefrons pale, including lower part which contrasts with darker postclypeus; (c) at least postclypeus and often labrum with dark markings, often largely dark; (d) border of occiput with high point in middle; (e) antehumeral stripe absent, indistinct or narrow and broken; (f) postdorsal stripes and collar fused into single straightish band along middorsal carina; (g) costa often dark; (h) branches of epiproct diverge widely (dorsal view). However, differs by (1) larger size, Hw 36-37 mm; (2) middorsal carina only with black spot on its tooth, rather than being largely lined with black; (3) cerci strongly swollen at base, touching each other, rather than being slender and sinuous and widely separated at base. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Habitat description

Streams shaded by forest. Often faster sections with a gravelly bottom and probably coarse detritus and rocks. From 1600 to 2700 m above sea level.

Distribution

confirmed: Ethiopia


Female © KD Dijkstra


Appendages (dorsal view)

Appendages (lateral view)

Thorax (lateral view)

Thorax (dorsal view)

Face (frontal view)

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


References

  • Consiglio, C. (1978). New and rare species of Notogomphus from Ethopia. Odonata collected in ethopia by the expeditions of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, 375, 53-58. [PDF file]
  • Clausnitzer, V. and Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (2005). The dragonflies (Odonata) of Ethiopia, with notes on the status of endemic taxa and the description of a new species. Entomologische Zeitschrift, 115, 117-130. [PDF file]

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2019-06-26].